Designers

Fashion Designers Pivot to Interior Design

In just three short years, Bessie Afnaim Corral and Oliver Corral had achieved what many young designers only dream of. By February 2020, their label, Arjé, known and beloved for its trophy-status shearling jackets and coats, was being carried by every major retailer, from Net-A-Porter to Selfridges. Then the first wave of Covid-19 lockdowns hit. No one was shopping for clothes, let alone a $3,000 shearling; everyone was stuck at home. As retailers started canceling orders, the Corrals, who met as co–head designers of Donna Karan’s Urban Zen (and are now married), made a radical decision: They would pivot to selling homewares and ultimately liquidate their clothing archives.

Despite having no formal interior-design training, the Corrals channeled their creative energies into gut renovating the Manhattan one-bedroom duplex that previously served as their design studio and living space. Their Instagram Stories from the past year look like what the Magnolia Network

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The Fashion Designers and Stylists Who Defined Fashion in 2021 – Voices of Style

For every celebrity whose style you’ve admired over the past year, there’s been a team of talented professionals working behind-the-scenes, crafting the outfits that have turned these stars into full fashion icons. Custom gowns and accessories are dreamed up by talented designers, who are no doubt aiming for that major ‘wow’ moment. And those seemingly effortless sweater-and-jeans combos? They come from the minds of hard-working stylists, who make sure every piece is perfectly paired.

Still, as we look toward the future, we know that simply enjoying these looks is not enough. The industry as a whole could benefit from change, opting for more sustainable and environmentally-friendly practices. There’s no shame in reimagining and wearing what’s already in your closet, and if you’re going to shop, it’s worth it to do your research, supporting brands with goals that align with your own.

As for where to start? We’ve

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Somali American designers take on refugee stereotypes in Minneapolis fashion pop-up

Fashion designers Mohamed Malim, 25, and Mohamed Hersi, 30, share similar backgrounds as former refugees. It’s an experience they are embracing and elevating as they launch a new fashion collaboration aimed at countering backlash against refugees and highlighting the power and beauty the arts can have in bringing communities together. 

The two designers will hold their first pop-up event between their brands Epimonia and Original Royal Refugee Saturday from 6-10 p.m. at Malim’s design studio in Minneapolis. The event is free and open to the public. COVID-19 safety precautions are being followed and guests are asked to wear masks. 

The capsule collection includes hoodies, long-sleeve shirts and jackets that integrate fabric from discarded life jackets to call attention to the refugee crisis and promote the use of recycled materials. Hersi also painted several life jackets that will be auctioned off during the event, with proceeds donated to several Minnesota nonprofits

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Fashion Designers Strive to Upgrade Gender-Neutral Clothing

Gender-neutral clothing is no longer an obscure corner of the fashion world, but as interest in such designs grows, some of the lines have been criticized as overly baggy and lacking imagination.

In some designers’ quest to fit every adult body, they have sometimes wound up pleasing no one.

Now, smaller companies are trying to reconfigure everything from cuts to closures in a bid to offer gender-neutral fashion with silhouettes and style. Their secret weapons? Zippers, stretch fabrics and redrawn size charts.

“When people do gender-neutral, they tend to do really blousy-like loose, oversized things, and I don’t know that everyone wants to dress like that,” said

Rob Smith,

chief executive and founder of the Phluid Project, which sells gender-free pieces online and in department stores including

Nordstrom Inc.

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