Keisha P. Crabtree

More Brits prefer online shopping since pandemic

FILE PHOTO: A man looks at his phone next to a shut down store, amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in London, Britain October 13, 2020. REUTERS/Simon Dawson

LONDON (Reuters) – About 70% of Britons say buying online and on mobile phones have become their preferred shopping methods, up from less than half prior to the coronavirus pandemic, according to a study by personal finance startup Credit Karma.

The study, which has not been previously reported, surveyed 1,034 adults in the UK in July to gauge how digital spending and banking habits have changed since COVID-19 restrictions began.

More than half of respondents said their online shopping had increased since the pandemic’s start, and of those, more than a third said their finances had taken a hit as a consequence.

“Healthy consumer spending, online or otherwise, is generally a sign of a healthy economy, which can be great

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NYFW Street Style Was the Freaky Release We All Needed

I am crouched in a doorway on 42nd Street with two tax accountants. It’s raining on the parade of celebs streaming out of the Moschino show, and as Megan Fox and Taraji P. Henson climb into their respective town cars, Jill Franco and Lauren Lovelace—both CPAs—are shielding their Bottega Veneta heels from the sudden downpour.

“We are not influencers,” Franco insists, although she’s wearing a head-to-toe look of runway pieces that can be procured only from a semisecret Italian showroom. “We are just fashion fans who actually buy the clothes we see on the runways. … And this season, I mean, it feels like I’ve been hiding inside for a year!” she laughs. “So I wanted to show off a little bit. I’m done with blending in.”

tax accountants showing off their street style at new york fashion week

Jill Franco and Lauren Lovelace

She’s not the only one. It’s day three of New York Fashion Week, and already, the looks have

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Carbone Adds Clothes to the Menu

Chef and restauranteur Mario Carbone sympathizes with the modern man’s dilemma, in part because he’s responsible for it. Imagine: this guy (it could be you!) has finally reserved that table at one of New York City’s most notoriously difficult-to-book restaurants—naturally, Mario’s own postmodern red-sauce joint, Carbone. (I’ll refer to him as Mario to avoid confusion with the restaurant that shares his name.) “He’s out with his girl and he’s trying to impress her,” Mario says, painting me a picture. “He’s looking through his closet and what’s he going to pull?” A suit feels too formal, graphic streetwear not quite right. Mario has an idea: how about a jacket-and-pant set and a crisp white short-sleeve button-up, all from his new menswear line Our Lady of Rocco?

If it seems somewhat unlikely that a beloved chef would moonlight as a fashion designer, then you aren’t familiar with Mario Carbone. His restaurant empire

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Walmart deliveries arrive via autonomous Ford cars

For some Walmart customers, online shopping will soon come with an autonomous twist.

The retailer will be partnering with Ford and its self-driving unit, Argo AI, to drop off deliveries to customers’ homes in Miami, Austin, and Washington, D.C.

Argo AI has been testing its autonomous vehicles in those cities already, but in the coming months it’ll drop off groceries and other supplies customers buy through the Walmart app or website. Autonomous delivery pricing will be the same as Walmart’s normal delivery fees.

Instead of the usual delivery method in a human-powered vehicle, items will be transported in a self-driving car (with a safety driver up front still). Customers will retrieve bags from the car once it arrives.

The car is noticeably marked as autonomous, if the sensors and equipment didn’t give it away.

An initial service area in each city will kick off later this year, with plans to

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