Fashion & Shopping

the beauty products to know about this week

Images courtesy of brands
Images courtesy of brands

Our lives are finally starting to resemble those of the harried Londoners we once were and – frankly – aren’t we taking it all in our stride?

From slurping coffee at our local café to chomping pizza at our nearest Italian, we’re finally back to pounding the pavements and it’s never felt better.

But as life ushers us back into its fold (at a one metre distance, of course), it’s imperative that we retain the adopted practices of self-care that we’ve spent the last four months indulging in.

It came as no surprise this week that a study found that 83 per cent of people have been reaching for skincare instead of beauty over the last few months, and even less shocking that 77 per cent of people have purchased new beauty products during lockdown.

After all, we’re immune to many things, but a new beauty

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At the Dior Cruise Runway Show, a Natural Beauty Look Fit For Zoom

Photo credit: Dior
Photo credit: Dior

From ELLE

From Valentino’s suspended realities to Balmain’s TikTok-centric boat show, the past couple of weeks have given us a strong taste of what the new virtual fashion show world will look like. But Dior’s Cruise 2021 presentation came with a nostalgic whiff for our old life of actual gatherings in-person.

At first glance, the show staged in Puglia at the Piazza del Duomo in Lecce, could be mistaken as archival Dior footage from the extreme Before Times. There were the usual models walking a runway, an elaborate illuminated set, and a full orchestra. Backstage, a throng of beauty editors were being advised on the looks created by acclaimed Dior makeup artist, Peter Phillips. Everything felt as it should be, or as it had been several months earlier, except this time, there was no live audience, and the traditional editor-and-artist interview that once happened in person

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Woman leaves job after senior leader’s harsh comments: ‘Words hurt’

Jessica-Joan Richards, a 28-year-old marketing manager working in recruitment, logged in to her LinkedIn account in early July to upload something she never thought she would share on the professional networking platform — her profile picture.

In a now-viral post, Richards, who was born in the Philippines before moving to the U.K. with her family when she was 7, explained that following an alleged body-shaming incident at a previous place of employment, she decided to delete her LinkedIn photo, in fear that her weight may ward off other professional opportunities.

“I had a previous senior leader say that I was too fat for my job & that I needed to lose weight,” Richards wrote. “Whether true or not, this statement really affected me, so much so that I stopped allowing my photo to be taken, personally & professionally. Removed my picture from LI for fear that people wouldn’t

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Unraveling Fashion, Beauty, and Trauma in I May Destroy You

Beautiful art can arise from the ugliest circumstances. No matter the medium, creators have channeled their trauma into healing through music, dance, poetry, painting, and, of course, film and television. Thundering into the collective consciousness of our current stay-at-home culture is the HBO series I May Destroy You, which multiple critics have described as a theoretical “traumedy,” a subgenre reflective of our time.

Actor, writer, director, and now executive producer Michaela Coel created the BBC-produced series following her assault after her drink was spiked in a bar. Coel’s protagonist, Arabella, wrestles with the emotional trauma of processing sexual assault through the 12-episode series, which debuted early last month on HBO. Following the model set by recent prestige streaming series including Little Fires Everywhere and Normal People, episodes roll out one at a time. While binge-watching might be our new normal, trust me: You’re going to want to sit

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