Hair

Black women’s hair products are killing us. Why isn’t more being done?

<span>Photograph: Hero Images Inc./Alamy Stock Photo/Alamy Stock Photo</span>

Photograph: Hero Images Inc./Alamy Stock Photo/Alamy Stock Photo

A new study reveals what some scientists and researchers have suspected for years – that frequent and long-term use of lye-based hair relaxers may have serious health effects, including breast cancer. Published in Oxford University’s Carcinogenesis Journal, the study found that Black women who used these products at least seven times a year for 15 or more years had a roughly 30% increased risk of developing breast cancer compared with more infrequent users.

The research team also analyzed survey data from Boston University’s Black Women’s Health Study, which followed more than 50,000 African American women for more than 25 years and observed their medical diagnoses and any factors that could influence their health. The results? Of the women followed from 1997 to 2017, 95% reported using lye-based relaxers, and ultimately 2,311 developed breast cancers.

This additional risk factor is just one part

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These Two Women Opened A Pop-Up Museum To Celebrate The Beauty Of Black Hair : NPR

A new pop-up Black Hair museum is creating a nostalgic experience to celebrate the diversity and evolution of Black hair throughout the decades.

Courtesy of The Black Hair Experience/


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Courtesy of The Black Hair Experience/

A new pop-up Black hair museum is creating a nostalgic experience to celebrate the diversity and evolution of Black hair throughout the decades.

The 15 installations will walk ticket holders through the eras of Black hair, where they can pose for photo ops throughout the interactive space. The Black Hair Experience is meant to celebrate how Black hair care and styling has changed over time, says founder Elizabeth Austin-Davis.

“We wanted to create a visual celebration of the experiences that tie us together regardless of how you wear your hair. Our goal was to create something that promoted self-love and celebrated the beauty of Black hair,” she says.

The pop-up museum

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Nordstrom features Haiti made face masks, hair accessories

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Haitian-American fashion designer Dayanne Danier was at the end of a 10-day trip to rural Central Haiti in late January checking on the production of her latest creations when one of the seamstresses turned to her as she prepared to leave.

“Don’t forget to send the fabric,” Danier, 43, recalled the woman saying. “Don’t take too long.”

Danier had been going back and forth between New York and Haiti since the country’s monstrous 2010 earthquake. She had watched as interest in Haiti’s handmade arts and crafts piqued soon after the disaster with well-known American designers buying and selling Haiti-made designs, only to quickly wane. She understood the meaning behind the woman’s plea.

“She was basically saying, ‘If you don’t send the fabric, we are going to have to go home,’” she recounted. “’Do whatever you’ve got to do for us to be consistently working.’“

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Hanahana Beauty Founder Abena Boamah on Growing Her Business and Drawing Hair Inspiration From Her Ghanaian Roots

Photo: Courtesy of Abena Boamah

Texture Diaries is a space for Black people across industries to reflect on their journeys to self-love and how accepting their hair, in all its glory, played a pivotal role in this process. Each week, they share their favorite hair rituals, products, and the biggest lessons they’ve learned when it comes to affirming their beauty and owning their unique hair texture.

Abena Boamah has been keeping her community moisturized since 2017, when she founded Hanahana Beauty, the place for moisturizing whipped shea butters, sourced from Ghana, in delicious and hydrating scents like lavender vanilla, eucalyptus, and bamboo coconut. Boamah has nurtured a passion for skin care from an early age. “Being Ghanaian, growing up, I always associated beauty with cleanliness and being moisturized. I was always told to look put together and to moisturize before school,” the founder, who now splits her time between Chicago

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